muspeccoll

muspeccoll:

What’s Blooming this Week: Lenten Rose

For this last week of Lent, our featured plant from the Mizzou Botanic Garden is helleborus orientalis,or Lenten Rose.  You’ll find them blooming on the west side of Ellis Library.  The plants in the photo are just outside the entrance to Ellis Auditorium.

Helleborus orientalis is native to Anatolia and was not introduced to European gardens until the mid-1800s.  It is grown primarily for its ornamental value. However, there are several other species in the hellebore family, and they were used medicinally in Europe for thousands of years.  In Medical Botany (London, 1790), William Woodville provides illustrations of two hellebores related to those growing on campus: Helleborus foetidus, or Bear’s Foot, and Helleborus niger, or Christmas Rose.

Woodville’s book is a work on plants, but he’s primarily interested in their medicinal uses.  Woodville writes that Helleborus niger was introduced in England in 1596, while Helleborus foetidus was “constantly used in medicine from the time of Hippocrates [and] was the only species of Hellebore known in the Materia Medica of our pharmacopoeias.”   He notes:

The smell of the recent plant is extremely fetid, and the taste is bitter, and remarkably acrid, insomuch, that when chewed, it excoriates the mouth and fauces; it commonly operates as a cathartic, sometimes as an emetic, and in large doses proves highly deleterious.  (54)

Of course, the Helleborus orientalis growing on our campus may have different properties than its cousins H. foetidus and H. niger.  It goes without saying, but we’ll say it anyway: the information provided here is most certainly not meant to provide any form of medical advice!

Many thanks to David Massey, a research specialist at Landscape Services, and to Pete Millier, director of the Mizzou Botanic Garden, for lending their wisdom for this post.

Posted by Kelli Hansen on Scripta Manent

darienlibrary
openbooksorg:

For disliking poetry as much as he does, this 5th grader is pretty good at writing it!
I hate poetry!
Poetry looks like a demon rising.
I don’t want to do this.
Poetry sounds like nails on a chalkboard.
I still don’t want to do this.
Poetry smells like skunk spray times 20.
I still don’t want to do this.
Poetry tastes like rotten eggs with human brains.
I will never do this again.
Poetry feels like being frozen by a freeze ray.
Doesn’t everybody hate poetry?
Panajotis wrote this at an Adventures in Creative Writing field trip that focused on slam poetry.

openbooksorg:

For disliking poetry as much as he does, this 5th grader is pretty good at writing it!

I hate poetry!

Poetry looks like a demon rising.

I don’t want to do this.

Poetry sounds like nails on a chalkboard.

I still don’t want to do this.

Poetry smells like skunk spray times 20.

I still don’t want to do this.

Poetry tastes like rotten eggs with human brains.

I will never do this again.

Poetry feels like being frozen by a freeze ray.

Doesn’t everybody hate poetry?

Panajotis wrote this at an Adventures in Creative Writing field trip that focused on slam poetry.

thelifeguardlibrarian
Why do some libraries insist on developing website content that is not being used? There’s no doubt it would be great if library users came to our sites to read book reviews, listen to podcasts, and calculate the value that the library delivers to them. We want to be a valuable resource. We want people to trust our opinions and rely on us for guidance. But just because this would be wonderful doesn’t mean it is going to happen.
newyorker

newyorker:

The Korean artist Jee Young Lee created an elaborate installation in her studio, in Seoul, using everyday materials—plywood, paper cups, straws—and handmade props. The constructed landscapes are her interpretations of personal experiences, dreams, and Korean folk tales. Take a look: http://nyr.kr/QrERhB

Top: “Reaching for the Stars”
Bottom: “I’ll Be Back”
All photographs by Jee Young Lee

icpl-teens
Patience is a hard discipline. It is not just waiting until something happens over which we have no control: the arrival of the bus, the end of the rain, the return of a friend, the resolution of a conflict. Patience is not a waiting passivity until someone else does something. Patience asks us to live the moment to the fullest, to be completely present to the moment, to taste the here and now, to be where we are. When we are impatient we try to get away from where we are. We behave as if the real thing will happen tomorrow, later and somewhere else. Let’s be patient and trust that the treasure we look for is hidden in the ground on which we stand.
Henri Nouwen (via creatingaquietmind)