the shrinking librarian

A shy violet keeps a library & information science scrapbook.

Aug 30
“You can be a tremendous librarian without putting so much stress on yourself. You don’t have to be a rockstar. A much better use of your energy is trying to be the kind of librarian you’d want to work with. Put your energy into that, my friends. And try to be the kind of librarian your patrons want. Maybe that means working on your business reference skills instead of getting on an ALA committee before your 30th birthday [Editor’s note: or even before your 40th]. So be it!”

Letters to a Young Librarian: You Don’t Have to Do All the Things to be an Awesome Librarian. Really. by Ginger Williams (via bustedafternoon)

(But also doing all these things is okay)

(via laurbrarian)


americanlibraryassoc:

Slate translated these 12 famous first lines from novels into emojis. Can you name them?
Answers below the cut!

Read More

americanlibraryassoc:

Slate translated these 12 famous first lines from novels into emojis. Can you name them?

Answers below the cut!

Read More


newyorker:

“It’s sobering to think that in just a few weeks Derek Jeter won’t be doing any of this anymore, and will be reduced to picturing himself in action, just the way the rest of us do,” Roger Angell writes.
(Accompanied by next week’s cover, “Derek Jeter Bows Out,” by Mark Ulriksen)

newyorker:

“It’s sobering to think that in just a few weeks Derek Jeter won’t be doing any of this anymore, and will be reduced to picturing himself in action, just the way the rest of us do,” Roger Angell writes.

(Accompanied by next week’s cover, “Derek Jeter Bows Out,” by Mark Ulriksen)


Aug 29
thiscityslungs:

"Diction-fairy"

thiscityslungs:

"Diction-fairy"

(via pumpkinfiresoul)


smithsonianlibraries:

detail from Hoover : the story of a crusade. (1926)

The marks on the carpet show how long each stroke should be and a metronome guides her in making a given number of strokes per minute. By measuring her carbon—dioxide exhalation while she works, the amount of energy required to sweep with different devices and in different ways—slow, fast, long strokes, short strokes, etc.—is accurately determined. Such tests were made to determine Hoover technique and they demonstrated that the Hoover offersthe least fatiguing way of cleaning carpets and rugs

smithsonianlibraries:

detail from Hoover : the story of a crusade. (1926)

The marks on the carpet show how long each stroke should be and a metronome guides her in making a given number of strokes per minute. By measuring her carbon—dioxide exhalation while she works, the amount of energy required to sweep with different devices and in different ways—slow, fast, long strokes, short strokes, etc.—is accurately determined. Such tests were made to determine Hoover technique and they demonstrated that the Hoover offers
the least fatiguing way of cleaning carpets and rugs


uispeccoll:

Here we have a lovely pocket edition of The Compleat Angler printed in 1825 in London by William Pickering.  Both an author and biographer, Izaak Walton’s (1593-1683) first edition of of The Compleat Angler was printed in 1653.  He produced a second edition almost immediately after in 1655.  In this second edition we see the format that subsequent editions have kept.  Walton wrote the book as a dialogue between travelers who practiced different forms of recreation: Piscator (fisherman), Venator (hunter), and Auceps (falconer).  Piscator teaches his companions the art of fishing and how its practice leads to a more meaningful life.  Walton continued to revise and reissue his work throughout his lifetime.  His friend Charles Cotton (1630-1687) worked on the piece as well, producing part two and finishing the text we are familiar with today.  

To get a sense of how small this book is I’ve included a few dry flies: a wooly bugger (fuzzy green one), a purple haze, and a CDC(cul de canard) Elk Hair caddis (small tan and orange one).

Jillian

799.12 W239 c1825


Aug 28

bookpatrol:

Minnesota: Land of 10,000 lakes and 1 floating library

There are lakes everywhere in Minnesota and now one of them has a floating library.

Thanks to Sarah Peters the contraption above is open for business on Cedar Lake in Minneapolis. Designed by Molly Reichert the 8 foot structure will hold upwards of 80 books for water travelers to peruse and check out.

Canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, skiffs, rowboats, or even inner tubes are invited to paddle up to the Library and browse the shelves from inside their watercraft. The library has both circulating and reference collections of artists’ books contributed by artists nationwide. A staff of friendly floating librarians facilitate the check out process and make reading suggestions

There are even drop off boxes on the shore to return the books.

About the project, Peters told the Minneapolis Star Tribune “Art books are not a widely known art form..And so there’s an element of delight and surprise. First of all, canoeing along and coming across a library. And then having it stocked with books that are totally unique. It’s like this double whammy of inventiveness. It can expand people’s ideas of what art is.”

True enough but it could also ruin a lot of those unique books. Granted one cannot enter the library but the confluence of books and water rarely ends well.

Perhaps a shore-based library by the landing dock could have achieved the goal of exposing people to the pleasures of book arts and artists books without  the high risk. But then again maybe the reward is in the risk.

Story at the Star Tribune: The land of 10,000 lakes now has a floating library 

Floating Library website

Flickr set of the Floating Library, 2013

h/t Shelf Awareness

(via libraryjournal)


bookpatrol:

Children’s Book House, Iowa City Public Library

bookpatrol:

Children’s Book House, Iowa City Public Library

(via fuckyeahiowacity)


the meantime

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the moment of realization that your quintessential self isn’t going to show up, which forces the role to fall upon the understudy, the humble kid for whom nothing is easy, who has spent years mouthing their lines in the wings before stumbling out into the glare of your life, which by then is already well into its second act.



mythosidhe:
Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.
gehayi:
Hell, the first named author in history? Enheduanna, a Sumerian high priestess, poet and lyricist. She’s known as the Shakespeare of Sumerian literature.
maryrobinette:
The first American mystery novel was written by Metta Victoria Fuller Victor, as well as the first dime novel, and the first crime novel..

mythosidhe:

Although I have to point out that there was a piece of speculative science fiction called The Blazing World published by one Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1666, slightly predating Mary Shelley.

gehayi:

Hell, the first named author in history? Enheduanna, a Sumerian high priestess, poet and lyricist. She’s known as the Shakespeare of Sumerian literature.

maryrobinette:

The first American mystery novel was written by Metta Victoria Fuller Victor, as well as the first dime novel, and the first crime novel..

(via laurbrarian)


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