the shrinking librarian

A shy violet keeps a library & information science scrapbook.

Sep 23
pickeringtonlibrary:

lego-stories:

Book monster

When a monster calls…it brings reading material. 

pickeringtonlibrary:

lego-stories:

Book monster

When a monster calls…it brings reading material. 

(via americanlibraryassoc)


Sep 22
lolshtus:

Finally, I Get To Know What They Mean

lolshtus:

Finally, I Get To Know What They Mean

(via niyis)


uispeccoll:

Happy Miniature Monday!

Here is a copy of Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena, published in 1896 by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, Italy.  The text was originally written by Galileo Galilei in 1615 to the Duchess Christina, and was an attempt to show that Copernicanism could be aligned with the doctrines of the Catholic Church.  Through writing to Christina, Galileo hoped to address a secondary audience of philosophers, mathematicians, and the politically powerful, with  the ultimate goal of dissuading the religious authorities from condemning Copernicus (Dietz Moss,Galileo’s Letter to Christina: Some Rhetorical Considerations).  

On top of the fascinating content, here is another interesting fact about this book that should excite all you Mini Monday fans out there. This edition from the Salmin Brothers is 18 x1 0 mm in size, and printed with hand-set type, which makes it (what it currently believed to be) the smallest book ever printed with movable, hand-set type.  The typeface used is called “flies’ eyes”, and was cut by Antonio Farina in 1834. We have another miniature printed with this typeface here, although it’s not as tiny. According to a Miniature Book Society Newsletter from 2002, “it took one month to print thirty pages” of Letter to Christina due to the difficulty of working so small.  Indeed, the text is so minute that it was pretty hard to get decent photos of the letters—I recommend coming by to see it  to get the full effect. Thus, this little book holds a pretty high place in both the history of printing and miniature books.  

 Galilei, Galileo. Galileo a Madama Cristina de Lorena. PaduaSalmin Brothers, 1896.  The Charlotte M. Smith Miniatures Collection, Uncatalogued.  

See all of our Miniature Monday posts here

-Laura H. 


Anonymous said: I'd love to read something spooky for October to get in the mood for Halloween. What do you recommend?

nypl:

Nonfiction:  Talking To The Dead: Kate and Maggie Fox and the Rise of Spiritualism by Barbara Weisberg. Follows the story of the Fox sisters, whose reports about strange noises in their mid-nineteenth-century home and claims that they could talk with ghosts gave rise to contemporary sâeance practices and modern beliefs about spiritualism.

Fiction: Ordinary Horror by David Searcy.  This is not your run-of-the-mill horror story.  There is a brooding sense of unease and disquiet that permeate the story.  More literary than most horror stories - somewhat akin to Henry James’ Turn of the Screw crossed with Stephen King’s The Plant.

- Wayne Roylance, Selection Team

I love Escape! The Story of the Great Houdini by Sid Flesichman for teens and adults. There is a lot about Houdini’s death on Halloween plus his wife’s attempts, after his death, to contact him during seances….despite Houdini’s deep seated disbelief and full on antagonism towards seances during his lifetime, not to mention his well publicized campaigns to defrock psychics and mediums. 

For full on creepy, few things - for me - surpass Clive Barker’s Abarat series, Hiromi Goto’s Half World, or Mo Hayder’s Devil of Nanking

- Amie Wright, Mgr. MyLibraryNYC

Read More



quirkbooks:

Dune, where’s my car?Bravo Simpsons. Bravo. 

quirkbooks:

Dune, where’s my car?

Bravo Simpsons. Bravo. 

(via prairielights)


yainterrobang:

LIST OF THE WEEK: TEN STORIES INSPIRED BY GREEK MYTHOLOGY
Need a break from the real world? Come visit Mount Olympus - or at least stories inspired by the gods. For more fun lists and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

(via gtpubliclibrary)



Sep 21
f4bulazy:

Props to my 6 year old self for calling out bullshit at an early age.

f4bulazy:

Props to my 6 year old self for calling out bullshit at an early age.

(via niyis)


Sep 20
oldbookillustrations:

First a speck, and then a vulture.
Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Indianapolis, 1906.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

First a speck, and then a vulture.

Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Indianapolis, 1906.

(Source: archive.org)


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