the shrinking librarian

A shy violet keeps a library & information science scrapbook.

Posts tagged books

Jul 10
“These days, most women develop personal lives before love lives. They struggle, make decisions, and grow up long before they worry about finding a life partner. Women are getting married later with the average marrying age at 27 according to the most recent Pew Report. That’s four years older than in 1990. Additionally, women’s roles in the workforce have changed radically in the last 50 years. Though incomes between men and women still remain unequal, more women are joining and staying in the workforce, even after they have kids. Their literary counterparts, however, don’t reflect that.” It’s Frustratingly Rare to Find a Novel About Women That’s Not About Love - Kelsey McKinney - The Atlantic (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)


Jun 23
schoollibraryjournal:

YA-inspired manicures? Make it a mani/pedi!
Check out 14 other sets of matching fingernails and book covers here.
(via BookRiot)

Two of my favorite things!

schoollibraryjournal:

YA-inspired manicures? Make it a mani/pedi!

Check out 14 other sets of matching fingernails and book covers here.

(via BookRiot)

Two of my favorite things!


Jun 8


May 17
alwaysalwaysalwaysthesea:

iowa has the nicest rest stops.

This is actually true. The rest areas on I-80 just east of of Iowa City (at Tiffin) are themed to reflect education and literature.  One direction includes architectural details featuring books, and the other includes calligraphic and typographic details, as well as pen and pencil sculpture.

alwaysalwaysalwaysthesea:

iowa has the nicest rest stops.

This is actually true. The rest areas on I-80 just east of of Iowa City (at Tiffin) are themed to reflect education and literature.  One direction includes architectural details featuring books, and the other includes calligraphic and typographic details, as well as pen and pencil sculpture.

(via fuckyeahiowa)


Apr 19

libraryjournal:

Five Great Things Libraries Are Doing With Old Books | LJ Insider

Library book sales (and their descendants, such as Better World Books) are a great institution, but they’re not the only thing libraries can do—or help their patrons do—with obsolete titles besides the dumpster. Here are five creative reuses from real libraries.

  1. Turning them into New Books

    In Richmond, VA, The People’s Library is a collaborative art project to create 100 handmade books of personal history. The Richmond Public Library helped collect discarded books to be recycled into paper, then bound into books with prompts inside them. They’ll be added to the library’s permanent collection, and patrons can check them out and respond to the prompts.

  2. Turning them into Art

    In Bath, England, the library found a new use for weeded books that don’t sell. Patrons collect a book and turn it into an art contest entrywith the help, if they like, of a series of library workshops. The resulting art projects are exhibited at the central library and online and the public votes for their favorites; the winner in each category receives a free ereader.

  3. Fixing Them

    For 40 years, Georgia’s Hall County Library System has partnered with the National Library Bindery to restore old books and Biblesbelonging to library patrons. Repairs take about two months, and patrons are charged for the service.

  4. Turning Them Into Furniture

    An oldie but a goodie: a reference desk made of books in a Dutch library.

  5. Turning Them into Fundraisers

    Recycled Reads, the Austin Public Library’s used bookstore, upcycles old books and media into crafts and sells the results.


Apr 13

libraryjournal:

Preach, Carl Sagan.


Mar 8

Jan 25
“You buy a book. You want to give the book to a store and have the store give you money. Then the store can give the book to someone else and get money from them.

You are allowed to do that now. But soon maybe you will not be allowed to do that anymore. You would have to ask the people who made the book if it was okay with them.

If they said yes you might have to give them some of the money. And if they said no you would have to keep the book or throw it out.

You also could not give it for a little while and get it back and give it to someone else. And it is not just books. It would also be movies or even just stuff that anyone wrote anything on the box of.”

LJ News Editor Meredith Schwartz took a crack at explaining the first sale doctrine using only the 1000 most common words. We think she wins the Hemingway award for shortest and most direct average sentence.

Can You Explain First Sale Using Only the Ten-Hundred Most Common Words?

(via libraryjournal)

(via libraryjournal)


Jan 17
“I like books, and I believe librarianship is about books, if you stop and think about how books equal stories, and it doesn’t matter what goddamn container they come in, be it paper, digital, audio, or a film or a video game. Stories are what people crave, and stories (like the storycorp partnership with libraries, or the not so new resurgence of reading aloud to adults–and adult librarians, if you need help on reading aloud, you know who to ask) are what libraries have and always will do best.” Ego, Thy Name Is Librarianship (via himissjulie)

(via libraryjournal)