laurbrarian
laurbrarian:

mshdbloggins:


Another great way to promote a library’s ebook collection is to develop shelf cards. These can be inserted into the books themselves or placed underneath them. This gives patrons a picture of the cover art and name of the book, as well as a web-link to the book entry in the library’s computer system. This is a little bit more extensive, but libraries have seen a 100% increase in loan-checkouts when they employ this method.

I’m doing a little thing at work about promoting e-stuff in physical spaces and this is one of the articles that caught my eye. I’d recommend a read of it to anyone looking for ways to promote e-things. I love the shelf cards. Awesome idea.

Oooh this is a great idea. Forever wishing there was an easier way to get patrons to Overdrive. 

Love this!!

laurbrarian:

mshdbloggins:

Another great way to promote a library’s ebook collection is to develop shelf cards. These can be inserted into the books themselves or placed underneath them. This gives patrons a picture of the cover art and name of the book, as well as a web-link to the book entry in the library’s computer system. This is a little bit more extensive, but libraries have seen a 100% increase in loan-checkouts when they employ this method.

I’m doing a little thing at work about promoting e-stuff in physical spaces and this is one of the articles that caught my eye. I’d recommend a read of it to anyone looking for ways to promote e-things. I love the shelf cards. Awesome idea.

Oooh this is a great idea. Forever wishing there was an easier way to get patrons to Overdrive. 

Love this!!

fuckyeahreading

Readers, if you can, get a Kindle.

writerightmeow:

I always thought I’d never get one because I love the physicality of a book. I thought the screen and electronics of a Kindle would distract me from the reading. But people, it’s the exact opposite.

I love my new Kindle. The screen isn’t like staring at a computer; the anti-glare component and the “softness” of the surface are not harsh on your eyes or your mind. Rather, I feel like my Kindle falls out of the picture all together while I’m reading. Without the clumsiness of page turning and trying to hold the book in a comfortable position while perhaps eating or lying in bed, the device disappears from my mind and allows me to actually be more focused on the reading itself.

Plus, I’m always reading more than one book at a time. With Kindle, I can always have all of my books on me at once without having to get a bigger backpack. It’s so nice to be able to slip this tiny thing into my purse and have it anytime anywhere: at the doctor’s office, waiting for the bus (in the rain, if you like), in a coffee shop, in line at the movies, etc.

Seriously, get a Kindle. You will probably read more often, faster, and better, because even if you don’t have a pen on you, you can highlight sections and make notes and email selections and basically the READING UNIVERSE IS WIDE OPEN.

myancientworld

thedisreputableblog:

bborgia:

The MET has got some wonderful, fully illustrated textbooks that are available online for free! (X)

DOWNLOAD
  1. Art of the Islamic World
  2. The Art of Africa
  3. The Art of Ancient Egypt
  4. The Art of the Ancient Near East
  5. The Art of Renaissance Europe
  6. The Art of South and Southeast Asia
  7. The Arts of Korea
  8. Auguste Rodin: The Burghers of Calais
  9. Greek Art from Prehistoric to Classical
  10. Islamic Art and Geometric Design: Activities for Learning
  11. A Masterwork of Byzantine Art — The Story of David and Goliath
  12. Medieval Art
  13. Nature Within Walls: The Chinese Garden Court at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  14. Roman Art

OH MY GODS OH MYGODSOHMYGODSOHMYGODS

uispeccoll

prairielights:

Prairie Lights featured on Forbes.com

"The bookstore’s continued success has much to do with its extensive event programming for patrons of all ages.  One whole floor of the three-story building is dedicated to childrens’ books. Some live readings are so popular, listeners must sit on the floor.  The store also draws customers through its carefully selected the books, often displayed with staff recommendations."

Gee, that list sounds familiar!

libraryjournal
libraryjournal:

Penguin Lifts Library Ebook Purchase Embargo - The Digital Shift

Penguin Group today announced that it will be changing the terms on its library ebook lending program, and on Tuesday, April 2, will begin allowing libraries to purchase and lend ebook titles the day that hardcover editions are released, according to The Associated Press. Previously, Penguin had placed a six month embargo on new ebooks, requiring libraries to wait half a year before purchasing.

(gif via)

libraryjournal:

Penguin Lifts Library Ebook Purchase Embargo - The Digital Shift

Penguin Group today announced that it will be changing the terms on its library ebook lending program, and on Tuesday, April 2, will begin allowing libraries to purchase and lend ebook titles the day that hardcover editions are released, according to The Associated Press. Previously, Penguin had placed a six month embargo on new ebooks, requiring libraries to wait half a year before purchasing.

(gif via)

libraryjournal
Under the new Provincetown Public Press digital publishing imprint, a dozen or so writers and artists will learn this year how to create a digital book of their work and market it on the Internet, library officials announced Thursday.

Provincetown Public Press, a new digital book publishing operation of the public library, is offering writers and artists the ability to create and distribute a digital book on the Internet.

This might be a first in the country, library director Cheryl Napsha said Friday. “We haven’t seen it anywhere. There are some libraries that are starting to print physical books using high-end copiers. To the best of my knowledge, no one has gone digital.”

The library is starting the press as a public service, she said. It will be funded by a $3,000 donation.
libraryjournal
What if you never had to endure the buyer’s remorse of abandoning a book and wishing you could get back the dollars you spent on a disappointing read? What if, instead, you only had to pay for the pages you actually read?

Total BooX, a publishing startup out of Tel Aviv, is attempting to give you the option. The company, set to launch later this month, offers users free access to all the ebooks in their digital warehouse (the collection currently exceeds 10,000) and charges proportionally. If you only read 10% of the book, you pay 10% of the list price.

Should EBooks Be Pay-As-You-Go? (via bookriot)

Not sure how this will work with libraries, although the company is working with several systems in the U.S. But the Personal Shelves that readers can create might be a useful RA tool for librarians and ease “discoverability” of new titles.

(via willywaldo)

libraryjournal

booksyarnink:

In addition to use habits, Pew compiled a laundry list of items patrons want from their libraries:

  • The ability to borrow books (80%).

  • More e-books (83%).

  • IPS navigation for locating books (62%).

  • Access to reference librarians (80%).

  • Redbox-style kiosks for renting books in public spaces outside the library (63%).

  • Free access to Internet-connected computers (77%).

  • An online “ask a librarian” service (73%).

  • Access to library materials via apps (63%).

  • An area to try out new devices (69%).

  • Amazon-style recommendation engines based on past checkout history (64%).

  • Free literacy programs for young children (82%).

Yet when asked whether they would be willing to give up existing resources to make room for these things — to move some books to off-site storage centers to make sense for a device-testing center, for instance — only 20% of survey participants said they were in favor. Thirty-six percent said libraries should “definitely” not move books off-site.

Which sums up the whole problem, really.

—- 

All of this makes me shake my head when I see the stories that have come out about “bookless libraries”.