darienlibrary

darienlibrary:

counterpunches:

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A trio of students from the Miami Ad School—Max Pilwat, Keri Tan and Ferdi Rodriguez—have came up with an innovative concept that allows people to read the first ten pages of popular books while riding the subway. 

Using near field communications (NFC) technology, commuters select the desired book from a list of popular titles and read its first ten pages—upon finishing, the reader will be informed of the closest library location from which they can pick up and read the rest of the book. 

This is a simple but ingenious idea that can be adopted and adapted to encourage reading in the 21st century, when new technology is changing the way we consume books. 

This made me squeal in a really unattractive way at my desk.

libraryjournal

booksyarnink:

In addition to use habits, Pew compiled a laundry list of items patrons want from their libraries:

  • The ability to borrow books (80%).

  • More e-books (83%).

  • IPS navigation for locating books (62%).

  • Access to reference librarians (80%).

  • Redbox-style kiosks for renting books in public spaces outside the library (63%).

  • Free access to Internet-connected computers (77%).

  • An online “ask a librarian” service (73%).

  • Access to library materials via apps (63%).

  • An area to try out new devices (69%).

  • Amazon-style recommendation engines based on past checkout history (64%).

  • Free literacy programs for young children (82%).

Yet when asked whether they would be willing to give up existing resources to make room for these things — to move some books to off-site storage centers to make sense for a device-testing center, for instance — only 20% of survey participants said they were in favor. Thirty-six percent said libraries should “definitely” not move books off-site.

Which sums up the whole problem, really.

—- 

All of this makes me shake my head when I see the stories that have come out about “bookless libraries”. 

kindlekwickstart

kindlekwickstart:

Now that we’ve dealt with the price gouging (sort of), I think its time we turned our attention to other issues. 

"This should be one of the great advances of ebooks: that if the printer makes a mistake, everyone doesn’t have to live with it until they sell through a million copies or whatever."

"A high-tech update of the traditional bookmobile is rolling into town.

The Digital Bookmobile National Tour is making five stops throughout Massachusetts this month, offering not books but interactive demonstrations for readers on how to download digital books from their public library, the bookmobile operator said in a statement.

Visitors to the 18-wheel tractor-trailer will discover how their portable electronic devices are compatible with their local library’s download service. The 74-foot vehicle is equipped with Internet-connected PCs, high-definition monitors, premium sound systems, and a variety of media players.”

(via Library Stuff)

"See Book, Read Book. For the past several weeks that’s been the mantra at OverDrive. It’s a vision of simplicity—an idea that drove us to develop easier ways to get more readers in front of the books they love to read and want to buy. Later this year, we’ll be delivering two new services that will extend publisher catalogs to more readers on a wide range of devices: OverDrive Read and streaming audiobooks."

(via Library Stuff)

"A new smartphone app, due out this fall, will be able to provide a virtual tour of Arlington National Cemetery, list events there and help visitors locate gravesites.

The new application will be available to the public in October, said Maj. Nick Miller, chief information officer for the cemetery. His team is already beta testing the app, which links geospatial mapping technology to digital records and tombstone photos.

The app provides a real-time schedule of burials, wreath-laying ceremonies and other events at the cemetery. Employees there have been using a similar internal application since March to help manage daily activities at the cemetery.”

(via Library Stuff)

thelifeguardlibrarian

thelifeguardlibrarian:

The Public Library Association has been awarded a planning grant of $50,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to support the research and design of a national digital summer reading (NDSR) program website application (app). PLA will work in partnership with Influx Library User Experience (Influx) to manage the grant project and plan development of the app. Expected to be built on the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) platform, the NDSR app will be available to all libraries in the U.S.

This groundbreaking effort will not only enhance the resources of public libraries to connect with children and teens in an interactive and modern way, but also take advantage and showcase the possibilities of open access through the DPLA. The anticipated NDSR website app will enable children and teens to interact with public libraries and summer reading content in numerous ways, including: reading, listening, watching, playing, writing, reviewing, drawing and recording. The ubiquity and flexibility of the digital environment also offers entirely new ways to expand the success of the traditional summer reading program. “This is a very exciting development for public libraries,” said Marcia Warner, PLA president and director of the Grand Rapids (Mich.) Public Library. “Many libraries struggle with the resources to present a robust summer reading program, but by developing this engaging tool and delivering it through the DPLA, libraries will have free access to an easy-to-deploy, dynamic summer reading website.”

Cooool.

Local Music @ Iowa City Public Library

People come and go in a college town. Bands come and go. Playing in a small market like Iowa City too often means day jobs, lots of travel, or playing locally so often that people begin to take you for granted.
Iowa City Public Library has loaned music for decades, CD’s most recently, but vinyl before that. The market for these is shrinking though, and we’ve been looking for a new model. Here it is.
If you have a library card and password, and live in Iowa City or an area that contracts with us (Iowa City, rural Johnson County, Hills or University Heights) you can download this music. You own it forever. Put it on your phone. Play it at parties. Turn it up.
Local musicians have kindly (and bravely) leased us the right to offer it to you. You can thank them by going out to hear them play.

I’m proud that my library is involved in this (even if I had nothing to do with it personally).
Jessamyn has a great Q&A with John Hiett up at librarian.net for anyone interested in more details!

Local Music @ Iowa City Public Library

People come and go in a college town. Bands come and go. Playing in a small market like Iowa City too often means day jobs, lots of travel, or playing locally so often that people begin to take you for granted.

Iowa City Public Library has loaned music for decades, CD’s most recently, but vinyl before that. The market for these is shrinking though, and we’ve been looking for a new model. Here it is.

If you have a library card and password, and live in Iowa City or an area that contracts with us (Iowa City, rural Johnson County, Hills or University Heights) you can download this music. You own it forever. Put it on your phone. Play it at parties. Turn it up.

Local musicians have kindly (and bravely) leased us the right to offer it to you. You can thank them by going out to hear them play.

I’m proud that my library is involved in this (even if I had nothing to do with it personally).

Jessamyn has a great Q&A with John Hiett up at librarian.net for anyone interested in more details!

"One of the curious things about SEO optimization is that it works by altering webpages so that they market themselves: that is, instead of creating ads external to the thing advertised, you re-shape the thing itself so that it’s easier to find and more interesting and attractive to link-clickers. And if we can do it with webpages, why not with, say, books? Why shouldn’t books undergo whatever ongoing tweaking they need to be as successful as possible?"

(via LISNews)