(via Awful Library Books)
From the original post: 

Holly: Well, folks? What do you think?  This is a  seemingly nice book that explains homosexuality in a way a child can  understand.  There is an unpleasant section where a woman on the street   says something about wishing gays would stay home so no one else had to  see them, and Jenny’s reaction to  hearing such a thing.  It is honest  and realistic, and shows Jenny in a loving family that even has contact  with Jenny’s mom.
Is it out of date or classic?  This one is tough for me to judge.   It’s old enough that the pictures are a little dated, but still relevant  enough to be useful.

Click thru for the discussion.

(via Awful Library Books)

From the original post: 

Holly: Well, folks? What do you think?  This is a seemingly nice book that explains homosexuality in a way a child can understand.  There is an unpleasant section where a woman on the street  says something about wishing gays would stay home so no one else had to see them, and Jenny’s reaction to  hearing such a thing.  It is honest and realistic, and shows Jenny in a loving family that even has contact with Jenny’s mom.

Is it out of date or classic?  This one is tough for me to judge.  It’s old enough that the pictures are a little dated, but still relevant enough to be useful.

Click thru for the discussion.

Familiar with doing readers advisory for fiction but not for nonfiction?  Why should fiction get all the attention?  Nonfiction books can be just as fun to read too.  For doing readers advisory for nonfiction, here’s a valuable reference tool: The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Nonfiction by Neal Wyatt, published by ALA Editions.

This is a quick review of a book that looks like it’s definitely worth checking out.  I took a course called “resources for adults.”  We spent one week on RA for each genre, with nonfiction treated as a genre.  I’m sure there’s so much more to consider than that!