thelifeguardlibrarian

In a Wikimedia blog post this week, Steven Walling shared news of an exciting partnership. JSTOR, that non-profit consortium-based database, beloved by high school and college students everywhere for its scholarly, authoritative content, will now provide the 100 most active Wikipedia editors with

free access to the complete archive collections on JSTOR, including more than 1,600 academic journals, primary source documents and other works. The authors who will receive accounts have collectively written more than 100,000 Wikipedia articles to date. Access to JSTOR, which is one of the most popular sources on English Wikipedia, will allow these editors to further fill in the gaps in the sum of all human knowledge.

Wikipedia and JSTOR partner (via thelibrarybug)

Cheersing this with my JSTOR mug.

(via lecieltumultueux)

This is very very exciting. I am so proud my stuffy JSTOR for being so damn fresh!

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

thelifeguardlibrarian

I am Philip Roth. I had reason recently to read for the first time the Wikipedia entry discussing my novel “The Human Stain.” The entry contains a serious misstatement that I would like to ask to have removed. This item entered Wikipedia not from the world of truthfulness but from the babble of literary gossip—there is no truth in it at all.

Yet when, through an official interlocutor, I recently petitioned Wikipedia to delete this misstatement, along with two others, my interlocutor was told by the “English Wikipedia Administrator”—in a letter dated August 25th and addressed to my interlocutor—that I, Roth, was not a credible source: “I understand your point that the author is the greatest authority on their own work,” writes the Wikipedia Administrator—“but we require secondary sources.”

Thus was created the occasion for this open letter. After failing to get a change made through the usual channels, I don’t know how else to proceed.

"… Wikipedia has been making a concerted effort in recent years to build alliances with academia, aiming not just for a better reputation but soliciting editorial participation from students and teachers alike. Part of that has come in the form of the Wikipedia Education Program, a pilot program where college students contribute to Wikipedia articles as part of their class assignments.

According to a study just released by the Wikimedia Foundation, early results of the initiative seem positive, with U.S. students participating in the program adding more significantly more quality content than regular new users.

These students added 1855 bytes of content that stayed on Wikipedia (that longevity is an important marker as long-time editors can be rather ruthless with challenging newcomers’ contributions).”

(via Library Stuff)

"Wikipedia hasn’t won the war against dead-tree companies yet, but research shows that the education system is slowly adopting it as tool in the classroom. As of 2012, 73% of teachers prohibit the use of Wikipedia for research by their students. That’s down from 86% in 2005, and shows a steady rise of adoption. The likely reason for things not moving along faster is that Wikipedia can be edited by anyone, causing concern about the accuracy of its information."

(via Library Stuff)

hclib
hclib:

Minneapolis History Wikipedia edit-a-thon
 
February 25, 10-5 pm, Special Collections Reading Room, 4th Floor, Minneapolis Central Library
 
We invite the Minnesota Wikipedia community and local historians to edit and augment entries in Wikipedia on Minneapolis history. Please help us increase the depth of information on Minneapolis history topics by utilizing materials in the Minneapolis Collection.  Find your own Minneapolis history topics to edit or work from a list developed by Special Collections Librarians.

Found via LISNews:  “Here’s a neat-and-easy programming idea to get local history buffs into  the library and promote your special collections: invite folks in for a  day of intensive Wikipedia-editing on local history entries.”

hclib:

Minneapolis History Wikipedia edit-a-thon
 
February 25, 10-5 pm, Special Collections Reading Room, 4th Floor, Minneapolis Central Library
 
We invite the Minnesota Wikipedia community and local historians to edit and augment entries in Wikipedia on Minneapolis history. Please help us increase the depth of information on Minneapolis history topics by utilizing materials in the Minneapolis Collection.  Find your own Minneapolis history topics to edit or work from a list developed by Special Collections Librarians.

Found via LISNews:  “Here’s a neat-and-easy programming idea to get local history buffs into the library and promote your special collections: invite folks in for a day of intensive Wikipedia-editing on local history entries.”

"A number of companies have protested against the bill, several of which wrote an open letter that was subsequently co-signed by AOL, eBay, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Mozilla, Twitter, Yahoo and Zynga.

As reported by TorrentFreak, Wikipedia is considering the most audacious protest yet, blanking out all of its pages. The article reports that Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has asked for community input; additionally, he ‘fears the bill could seriously hurt the Internet and thinks that blanking out Wikipedia will send a strong message to lawmakers’.”

(via LISNews)

"In the fall, Rochelle A. Davis, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, told undergraduates in her culture and politics course to create a Wikipedia page about a community they belonged to, then use that research to develop a thesis for an academic paper.

'Collectively, they were the best papers I’ve ever read at Georgetown,' Davis said. She said students benefited from vetting their ideas with a wider community — a practice that could help academics at all levels. 'This is where we are going,' she said. 'I think that’s a good thing.'”

(via Library Stuff)